Archive for Seeking Truth – Page 2

Jesus Got Up: Happy Easter

Happy Easter! I hope you are having an Easter filled with family, joy, and Jesus. We have been gifted with truly beautiful time around these parts.

Our wiggly two-year old was able to attend Holy Thursday and Easter mass, and I am always amazed by how much of these celebrations she is able to absorb. After Holy Thursday, every time she heard the word Jesus she would bend to touch our feet and say in the perfect toddler voice, “wash.” On Good Friday we talked about how Jesus died because he loves us so much. Drawing on past experiences of death like The Lion King and a great-grandfather passing.

Then came Easter, how was I going to explain the Resurrection to my daughter? I didn’t know if I could totally explain it to myself. We started to use the language “rise from he dead”, but it didn’t seem to ring any bells. Then all of the sudden out of the mouth of babes, Anna said “up”. She found a word in our explanation that made sense.

We would ask her what happened to Jesus and she would gesture with her hand and say joyfully with her mouth “up!” How simple, how perfect, how truly wise.

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Examination of Conscience… What role am I playing in Holy Week?

In our church home on Palm Sunday we always hear the passion gospel as a dramatic reading. This interactive (and long) gospel helps to begin Holy Week with the reality of Christ crucified. In this script format, the congregation typically plays the part of the crowds.

I have to admit though, I cringe each year as the crowd is asked to shout, “Crucify him! Crucify him!” I hate being a part of the crowd in that moment, realizing it is my stubborn heart that chooses sin over Christ. It reminds me that each day I choose to play a part in the passion history. Read More →

An Inconvenient Mercy

This year has been named the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy. A year where as a collective church we mediate on the greatness of God’s mercy and how it should move us to show mercy for others.

As I ponder mercy, memories rush to my mind. Waking up each morning with the gift of new mercies from God, times I have witnessed a friend extend mercy to someone in misfortune, or the frequent occurrence of my husband offering me mercy in the times I have wronged him. It seems to me, mercy is a word that describes a myriad of things. So to paraphrase Justin Bieber what does it mean? Read More →

Live Your Song: A Lenten meditation from Jon Foreman’s TED Talk

This week Jon Foreman delivered a TedX Talk at the University of Nevada named Live Your Song. He presented a simple and elegant idea about living your life’s song (or purpose). The TED talk-ing intermixed seamlessly within a set of 3 acoustic songs. As Jon bounced between his spoken and lyrical words, the talk did not have the typical drama and performance of a TED talk, instead it was seeping with sincerity, in a style reminiscent of conversational slam poetry.

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It was clear that Jon Foreman was so very passionate about the words he had to share. He wanted to remind us of our temporary and limited life, but at the same time paint a beautiful picture of our significance. He highlights the grandness of our calling without forgetting to mention the effort and struggle it takes to get up and thoughtfully make moves toward our purpose in the world. His words encourage us to humbly realize who we are and that the life we live matters. As I listened to the talk, I couldn’t help but relate his message to the season and mindset of lent.

I think it is fair to say, I loved the talk. Here are 7 quick thoughts and truths for lent, each one structured around a quote from Jon Forman’s TED talk. Read More →

Come Holy Spirit…In Remembrance

Lately the prayer on my heart has been Come Holy Spirit.

The Salt Stories: Come Holy Spirit... In Remembrance

In the last 2 years we have lost many dear friends and family members. Each loss has been an opportunity to dwell on a life well lived, with glimpses of God’s glory. Today I would like to honor one of our dear friends, Deacon Timothy Borbas.
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Explaining death to a toddler

It all started when we watched The Lion King for the first time. I was excited to share one of my favorite movies with Anna. We named each animal during Circle of Life, laughed at Zazu, danced to “I Just Can’t Wait To Be King” and then it happened… Mufasa died.

We watched the solemn images of a collapsed Mufasa and tears streaming down Simba’s face. My daughter turned and looked at me with a questioning stare. She could see Simba was sad and didn’t quite understand what happened. She gestured to the screen and looked at me for an explanation.

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A Rustic Nativity

Happy 9th day of Christmas. I hope this season has been full of joy, cookies, peace, and good company. For truly we have something absolutely beautiful to celebrate. God became man. Whoa! The God that made the world, and came before the world came into the creation.

Incarnation. Truly crazy.

We have enjoyed the beautiful Christmastide with our daughter, but her opinions and play have definitely added a new component to our celebrations.

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Throughout the Advent and the Christmas season we have put together a paper nativity scene. Anna has daily and joyfully chosen the colors for our new characters and placed each new piece into the scene with enthusiasm. This set from do small things with love has been perfect for us this year. Read More →

The value of ancient words

Is there value in repeating ancient words?

Often I feel more comfortable in the tradition of spontaneous prayers. Prayer where I piece the words together in the moment and express myself like I would to a friend over coffee. This free form stream of conscious type prayer is a sincere and powerful extension of my heart, but recently I have found a new peace and strength in the prayers passed down through Christian tradition.

A huge collection of ancient prayers dripping in history, theology, and truth are still repeated by millions of Christians from all over the world today. Words that were written down long ago and have journeyed through history in the mouths of searching people. Maybe you have prayed some of them before, some come from scripture like, The Our Father, The Magnificat, Simeon and Zachary’s Song, and The Doxology. There are also many prayers passed down through tradition of the church like the prayers of Ignatius of Antioch and Hippolytos of Rome, the Nicene creed, and the church’s liturgical prayers of baptism.

So this is my attempt to understand how the prayers of the historic church can be a peaceful and beneficial part of my regular prayer? Read More →

Hope Breakdown

Hope, I do not think it means what you think it means.

princess-bride

Hope is one of those words that people, including myself, throw around without a clear understanding of what it means. And let me tell you, it is hard to have hope, if you don’t really know what it looks like.

So here begins my search for a working definition of hope. One that would help me use this virtue in the midst of trying and uncertain times.

Then I found it, Eureka! Paul’s words in the book of Timothy, “For it is for this we labor and strive, because we have fixed our hope on the living God, who is the Savior of all men, especially of believers.” (4:10)

We have it, our working definition…

Hope: To strive for difficult things because of God’s help.

So lets break this down. Read More →

Finding Hope in Christ the King

At the parish where I grew up, on the feast of Christ the King all of the families would make fabric banners to celebrate the King. Before mass began, the children would march around the church to honor Jesus with a parade. There were bells, crowns, colors, and joy bursting out of the room. Our pastor would have us all shout ¡Viva Cristo Rey! Which was an anthem of Mexican Christians at the turn of the century. The spirited phrase means long live Christ the King. Just the thought of this feast brings warm memories to mind.

This was a very fun and memorable experience that taught me so much about Christ’s kingship. Read More →